Resources
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Coping with life after cancer treatment
Now that your active treatment is finished, you are considered to be in the ‘survivorship’ stage. Shifting from ‘patient’ to ‘survivor’ can bring up lots of different emotions. You may feel relieved that treatment is over, excited about the future, and...
CanTeen
If cancer comes back
Sometimes, sadly, cancer can return. This is called recurrence or relapse. It means the return of a sign, symptom or tumour after you’ve been in remission (cancer-free). Dealing with a relapse can be just as hard as, or harder than, dealing with your...
CanTeen
Returning to school or study
Going back to school or study (at Uni or TAFE) – or starting a new course – after you finish your cancer treatment can be challenging. But these are big parts of your life, so getting back into school or study can help you create your ‘new normal’ after...
CanTeen
Relationships after cancer
It’s pretty likely that every one of your relationships has been affected in some way by your cancer experience. After everything you’ve been through, your role in your family, group of friends or relationships is going to be different. You have changed...
CanTeen
Physical impacts and body image after treatment
Looking after yourself will give your body and mind a much better chance of recovering after cancer and maintaining good health in the future. Looking after your body There is strong evidence that eating well, exercise and not smoking are important for...
CanTeen
Finding your new normal
Many young people and families think that life will just go back to the way it was once cancer treatment ends. But you have just dealt with a life-threatening illness! Your life has  seriously  changed. So rather than trying to go back to how it was you...
CanTeen
Complicated Grief and Depression After Cancer
When you are grieving, it is normal for everyday things to seem hard and for you to have lots of mixed and really strong emotions – sadness, anger, loneliness, anxiety – sometimes over a long period of time. That’s why grief and depression sometimes get...
CanTeen
My Brother and Dad Both had Cancer
My phone rang and I was told ‘Your brother has cancer’… words you never expect to hear. My brother Taylor was 15 when he was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma. The only way he knew anything was wrong was because he had pain in his knee. Our family thought of...
CanTeen
I Learnt How to be Strong
My name is Jack and I am 15 years old. I am a bereaved sibling residing in Townsville. My only sister Amy was 7 years young when she was diagnosed with brain cancer on the 17th of December 2007. When my parents first told me that my sister has...
CanTeen
Facing Anniversaries and Celebrations
One of the hardest things about the death of a parent or brother or sister is realising that they won’t be around to share birthdays, holidays, celebrations and other important events in your life. These special events can all be difficult after someone...
CanTeen
Dealing with Practical Issues After Loss
When you are grieving you may wish the rest of the world would stop, but it doesn’t. On top of all the emotions you’re dealing with, you may have to deal with the practical things that have to be done when someone dies as well as chores around the house...
CanTeen
A Story About My Brother
My name is Emily and this is the story of my twin brother Mitchell. Mitch was diagnosed in October 1998 with a brain tumour. He underwent numerous operations over the years at Hospital; his last operation was in July 2005. When Mitch got sick he was very...
CanTeen
Getting Support After Loss
Getting the right sort of support when you are grieving is very important but asking for help can be difficult too. Because the grieving process lasts for a long time, what kind of support you want/need may change over time and asking for it may get if...
CanTeen
The Emotional Side of Loss
People feel and show grief in many different ways. Some feel extreme sadness and cry a lot. Others feel out of control and angry. Some people say they have a hard time sleeping and eating, while others experience exactly the opposite and want to sleep or...
CanTeen
Changes in Relationships After Loss
Family relationships All of your relationships are going to be affected by the death of your mum or dad or sister or brother, but especially the relationships with and between your family members. You’re all grieving, and that can put a strain on all...
CanTeen
Telling people
Most of your friends probably know that your parent or sibling has been having cancer treatment. But having to tell them that your loved one has died and face their questions about how you’re handling it is not easy. It’s up to you to decide who to tell,...
CanTeen
Fertility
Some cancer treatments can affect your future fertility, which means your ability to have a baby that is biologically yours (has your genes or DNA). Not all cancers or cancer treatments affect future fertility. It depends on your age, your cancer type of...
CanTeen
Five Signs of Cancer
Every day, another three young Australians aged 15 to 25 years are diagnosed with cancer. Recognising the early warning signs of cancer for adolescents and young adults is the first step towards timely treatment and achieving the best outcome for these...
CanTeen
Fertility Preservation Options – For Females
This page explains some of the fertility preservation options available to you before you start treatment. If you want more information on how different cancer treatments can affect your fertility see  Cancer and fertility – for females . If you have see...
CanTeen
Cancer Data: Adolescents & Young Adults in Australia
The report,  Cancer Data: Adolescents & Young Adults in Australia  undertaken by CanTeen presents national and international comparative data for young people diagnosed with cancer in Australia. These data are critical to guide service planning for young...
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